Report Of The Ministerial Committee On Facts Finding And The Way Forward On Apo Resettlement Scheme



bala fctThe report of the ministerial committee  recommended the following among others:

There should be a review of the FCT Resettlement policy in accordance with the best global practices which new policy should be approved by FEC and gazette.

  • 75 people confirmed to have been omitted in allocation of houses and 105 omitted in the allocation of plots, be considered for resettlement immediately. See Appendix D1-D2.
  • The 81 people that collected houses and 81 plots respectively at the integrated zone, should be made to return them to the . See Appendix E.
  • Commercial plots should be provided in the proposed new layout, and allocate same to indigenes to care of their commercial interest.
  • The approved movement allowance be reviewed upwards to the of One Hundred and Ten Thousand Naira (N110,000).
  • A unit of Development Control Department be resident in the Resettlement site for harmonious working relationship with staff of Department of Resettlement and Compensation.
  • The FCT should give priority to resettlement projects by ensuring adequate budgetary provisions, prompt payment of compensation, and timely implementation of all resettlement schemes.
  • In view of the growing security implications and the huge capital resources involved in Resettlement and Compensation, FCTA should seek the approval of His Excellency, Mr. President to place the scheme in the National priority budget.
  • The movement of His Excellency to Apo Resettlement Site should be in phases commencing with those certified to have been fully settled to move within the period of 3 months. See Appendix F1-F2.
  • The neighbourhood centres/public facilities which have been allocated to other Nigerians should be revoked and reverted to AMAC for its original use/purpose for the benefit of the indigenes.
  • With respect to the provisions of infrastructure at Phase II, it is recommended that the compensation claims be paid immediately, this will allow the contractors to resume work and complete the project as scheduled.
  • There should always be an enlarged community participation in the entire resettlement process.

Read the report below:

THE REPORT OF THE MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE

ON

FACTS FINDING AND THE WAY FORWARD

ON APO RESETTLEMENT SCHEME

DECEMBER, 2012

TABLE OF CONTENT

 

1.0: BACKGROUND

1.1:     1991 Integration Policy

1.2:     Resettlement Policy

1:3:     Garki Resettlement Scheme

 

2.0: MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE ON FACTS FINDING AND WAY

FORWARD ON APO RESETTLEMENT

2.1:     Introduction

2.2:     Membership

2:3:     Terms of Reference

3.0: METHODOLOGY/APPROACH

3.1:     Meetings/Interactive Sessions

3.2:     Document Analysis

3:3:     On Site

3.4:     Special Assignment

3.5:    

 

4.0: FINDINGS/OBSERVATION

5.0: ANALYSIS OF FINDINGS

5.1:     Changes in Socio-Economic Status of the Garki Community

5.2:     The Concept of Integration

5.3:     Enumeration of Exercise

5.4:     Inconsistent and untimely Policy Implementation

5.5:     Database/Record Keeping

5.6:     the Issues of Other Nigerians

 

6.0: RECOMMENDATIONS

7.0: CONCLUSION

8.0: APPENDIX

1.0             Background:

At the inception of Abuja in 1976, the Resettlement policy was initially that of Total Resettlement of the original inhabitant s in their various states of origin. To that effect, in 1977, about 316,000 households were enumerated for resettlement. It would be recalled that partial resettlement of the inhabitants of the Federal Capital City was done to pave way for accelerated , particularly the resettlement in new Karu, New Nyanay in the Nasarawa State and New Wuse in Niger State.

The intention behind the Total Resettlement policy was that the target population within the Territory was quite small and could be resettled completely. However, in view of the unexpected large number of persons involved, and the huge resources required, the Federal Military Government of Nigeria in 1978 issued a circular to the then three contiguous states viz; Niger, Plateau and Kwara states, from where FCT was carved out, amending the policy of Total Resettlement of all persons out of the Territory to that of the original inhabitants, having the option of being resettled within or outside the Territory. See Appendix A.

 

1.1             1991 Integration Policy:

The FCT under Major General Gado Nasko came up with the Integration Policy 1991 beginning with Garki Village, following recommendations of the Senator Ahmed Rufai Misau Committee on Resettlement. The main-thrust of the Policy was to ensure that the original inhabitants were assimilated into city life with other Nigerians. The Policy was adjudged to have a comparatively cheaper cost implication and less political rancor with regard to replacing Nigerians with other Nigerians. However, despite the aforementioned advantages, the Policy was poorly managed and also contributed to the distortion of the FCT master plan.

1.2             2005 Resettlement Policy:

As the integration objective became unrealistic, the Federal Capital Territory in 2005 evolved a new Resettlement Policy. The new policy involved moving the original inhabitants outside the Federal Capital City and any other areas designated for development.

In furtherance of this new policy, the FCTA in 2005 commenced the enumeration of original inhabitants. Data obtained from this enumeration was used in the planning of the new Resettlement Scheme that was embarked upon in 2006/2007. In the implementation of this Policy, a total of 12 communities were earmarked for resettlement. In the first phase, four Resettlement Sites were identified, namely;

  1. Apo (460 hectares in Abuja Municipal Area Council) meant for Garki, Apo and Akpanjanya.
  2. Galuwyi/Shere (900 hectares in Bwari Area Council).
  3. Wasa (700 hectares in Abuja Municipal Area Council).
  4. Anagada (2,519 hectares in Gwagwalada Area Council).

The new Policy entails that the Federal Capital Territory Administration provides resettlement houses and also infrastructure facilities such as roads, water, electricity, clinics, schools, community centres, etc; with a view to ensuring better living standards compared to what was obtained before resettlement.

1.3             2007 Garki Resettlement Scheme:

Several attempts at resettling the Garki community have not yielded the desired result. To recap, we had a Total Evacuation Scheme, Kubwa Resettlement Scheme, and the Integration Scheme, all had respectively failed.

The implementation of the Apo Resettlement Scheme which commenced in 2007 was designed to resettle three (3) communities namely; Apo, Akpanjanya and Garki. The Scheme involve construction of houses for each house/roof to be replaced, the provision of infrastructure and social service/amenities, while plots of land are to be allocated to adults within the age bracket of 18 years at the time of enumeration.

The allocation of houses and plots to beneficiaries has since been concluded. While the provision of infrastructure to the Scheme site is on-going. However, the Garki Community which constitute more than 80% of those to be resettled has not moved, thereby jeopardizing the entire scheme. There were litigations and numerous complaints summarized as follows:

  1. That they were not carried along in the design of the houses, the rooms are so small and unfit for human habitation.
  2. That they lack space for future expansion.
  3. That some persons entitled to houses were allocated plots, while houses meant for resettlement were allocated to non-indigenes.
  4. That the names of some families are missing from the list.
  5. That plots meant for the Communities targeted for resettlement have been given to other Nigerians.
  6. That outstanding compensation claims with respect to farmlands which were acquired in the implementation of the Resettlement Scheme are yet to be addressed.
  7. That they prefer integration and should therefore be allowed to remain in (Garki Village) their location

2.0             MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE ON FACTS FINDING AN WAY FORWARD ON APO RESETTLEMENT:

2.1             Introduction:

The Honourable Minister of State, Oloye Olajumoke Akinkide, in view of the affecting the Apo Resettlement Scheme, on the 2nd August, 2012 set up a committee to resolve all issues/problems affecting the scheme and to make appropriate recommendations to enable the FCT Administration effect the movement.

2.2             MEMBERSHIP OF THE COMMITTEE:

  1. Helen S. Oloja (Mrs)                  Solicitor General                  Chairperson

Legal Services Secretariat

  1. Arch Joshua S. Kaura                Director M & E (ACSS)       Vice Chairman
  2. Hon. Micah Y. Jiba                    Chairman AMAC                 Member
  3. Mr. Francis Okechukwu            Director R & C                      Member
  4. Mr. Tukur Ibrahim Bakori        Director STDA                      Member
  5. Arch Eni O. Ugot FNIA      Director Public Buidg. FCDA Member
  6. Helen Obichina                    DD Planning & Resettlement   Member
  7. E. O. Odebode                             DD Valuation & Comp.       Member
  8. Baba Kura Umar                         DD Monitoring & Control  Member

10. Tpl. Abubakar Sulieman           Director URP FCDA            Member

11. Tpl. S. O. Awoniyi                      SA Lands PS                          Member

12. Hussaini A. Badeggi                  SA Lands HM                       Member

CO-OPTED MEMBERS

13. Basir Muhammed           Dir. FCT Security Services Dept    Member

14. Tpl. Obi Okechukwu                 DD, Regional Planning        Member

15. Tpl. Adamu M. Adamu              Rep Dir, URP Dept               Member

16. Surv. Baba-Ngari Halilu B        Dept of Surv & Mapping     Member

17. Sanusi A. A.                                Rep DSS                                 Member

18. Bello Abdul-Lateef        Rep. Dir Security Services Dept    Member

19. Bildr. I. A. Momoh-Jimoh   Rep Director Pub Bldg FCDA Member

20. Arch Andrew Gaza                    Rep AMAC Chairman         Member

21. Joshua Tukura                            Rep AMAC Chairman         Member

22. Yakbu Steven                             Rep AMAC Chairman         Member

SECRETARIAT

23. Barr. Festus Tsarvsar                 Legal Adviser to HMS

24. Tpl. Ogenyi Ogbe Benedict      PA (Resettlement) HMS

 

2.3             TERMS OF REFERENCE:

The Committee was given the following Terms of Reference:

  1. To highlight all outstanding issues affecting Apo Resettlement Scheme
  2. To look into the complaints by the indigenes on cases of omission of allocation of houses and plots
  3. To identify, give accurate data on aggrieved persons and liaise with the Communities in order to come up with immediate and lasting solution to the identified problems.
  4. To explore out of Court settlement where there are litigations.
  5. To suggest new areas for layout plans where the affected indigenes will be resettled.
  6. To ensure commitment from all aggrieved parties and stakeholders through direct discussions and negotiations in order to gain their confidence and effect peaceful relocation to Apo before the end of 2012.
  7. And consider any other matter that would assist the Administration in resolving the problems identified.

The Committee was given four weeks (4) to deliberate on the said Terms of Reference and submit its report.

3.0             METHODOLOGY/APPROACH:

Considering the fundamental issues raised in the Terms of Reference and the urgency involved, the Committee drew up a basic programme of action to facilitate the of a comprehensive and a reliable Report within the time frame. The Committee therefore adopted the following:

3.1             Meeting/Interview Sessions:

The Committee went into action immediately after the inauguration and sat three (3) times in a week for 16 weeks. The interactive sessions which involved Garki, Apo and Akpajanya communities led by the community Leaders/Stakeholders were held daily for a week. In such meetings, claims were verified and new revelations were gathered.

 

All the meetings, aside the two courtesy meetings held in the Sa-Peyi’s palace were held at the Conference Hall of FCT Archives and History Bureau, Area 11, Garki – Abuja.

3.2             Document Analysis:

The Committee demanded and received a number of documents related to Apo Resettlement Scheme from the Department of Resettlement and Compensation namely;

  1. Minutes of the interactive meetings with the three Communities criteria for resettlement, tagged Appendix 1.
  2. Minutes of the meeting of the Committee on movement of Apo, Akpajanya and Garki Community to Apo Resettlement site, tagged Appendix II.
  3. List of houses & plot allocations by the Department of Resettlement tagged Appendix III
  4. Harmonized list of houses and plots allocations signed by Representatives of each Community , tagged Appendix IV
  5. Second harmonized list (as amended by the Chairman AMAC and Chief of Garki), tagged Appendix V
  6. Final list of Allotees, tagged Appendix VI
  7. Details of findings from the list collectively submitted by Garki, Apo and Akpajanyi Villages in their petitions to the Department of Resettlement and Compensation/High Court, tagged Appendix VII
  8. Statement of Claims tagged Appendix VIII
  9. Details of Allocations, Complaints, Findings and Recommendations in respect of Garki Gbagyi and Hausa Community.
  10. List of Integrated compounds in Garki Village.

3.3             On Site :

To verify the claims of the aggrieved communities to be resettled, the Sub-Committee on special assignment first visited the affected sites in Garki, Akpajanyi and the new Resettlement site in Apo. Similarly, after hearing from the Stakeholders/Leaders of the communities, the entire committee visited the sites and photographs were taken to enable her put its observations/findings fairly and objectively. See Appendix B.

3.4             Special Assignment:

In view of the complexity of issues that arose from the documents analysis, the need to assign specific responsibilities to certain members of the committee became imperative a sub-committee was therefore assigned Inter-alia, to examine and harmonize the list of claims as contained in a number of documents received from the Department of Resettlement and Compensation.

3.5             :

  1. Inadequate data
  2. Difficulties in accessing information on time.

4.0             FINDINGS/OBSERVATIONS:

The Committee having read through the documents received from the Department of Resettlement and Compensation, in addition to the extensive interactive sessions with the Leaders and Stakeholders of the Garki Communities, and the on-site , observed as follows that:

  1. The Garki, Apo and Akpajanya Communities were willing to move to Apo Resettlement Town if their grievance were addressed by the Administration.
  2. There has been inconsistency in the Resettlement Policy coupled with the criteria used in their implementations by successive FCT Administrations.
  3. The level of participation of Garki Community in the entire Resettlement process was not inclusive enough
  4. There were disparities in the number of houses and plots to be provided by the FCT Administration as against what was claimed by the Community.
  5. The failure to resolve peculiar issues raised by the Garki Community in previous resettlement efforts contributed to the delay in the movement to the Apo Resettlement site (see analysis of findings).
  6. The total number of enumeration for the three communities; Garki, Apo and Akpajanya from the records of the Department of Resettlement and Compensation was 7,l315 including other Nigerians.
  7. Out of 605 names claimed to have been omitted by the community, 180 were confirmed by the committee to be genuine and require consideration. See Appendix C.
  8. In the course of Committee sittings, fresh complaints on omissions/ replacement were received, and more of such complaints are coming.
  9. The Contract for those uncompleted houses has been terminated. See Appendix C1-C3. However, 14 of these houses have been completed and occupied.
  10. Out of the 877 houses earmarked for Resettlement in Apo, 28 houses are yet to be completed. However, fourteen (14) houses have been completed.
  11. Substantial infrastructure has been provided within the built up area to facilitate movement. However, much has not been achieved in Phase II due to compensation claims.
  12. There is no clarity on the exact number of houses to be left in the integrated zone.
  13. Am emerging development with respect to the area earlier designate as integration zone, which were not considered in the Resettlement plan, but now requesting to be considered in the Resettlement Scheme at Apo.
  14. There are differing positions of the Community on the issue of Apo Resettlement, as some people are willing to move, others are not.
  15. The representatives of the Community might not have been fair in reporting issues appropriately to their people.
  16. There is occupational change in the Communities due to urbanizations, such that the Community’s main occupation which has been farming is now changing towards commerce.
  17. The movement allowance of Thirty-Five Thousand Naira (N35,000) as proposed was not acceptable to the Community.
  18. The Sa-Peyi’s new Palace which was completed some years back is now in a state of disrepair.
  19. There was an encroachment on the Apo Resettlement Site, particularly the neighbourhood centres, public facilities, and flood plains by the Land Department/Abuja Geographical Information Systems (AGIS).
  20. There are two pending cases in court, filed by the Garki Community against the FCT Administration.
  21. There is poor synergy between the Technical Department of the Federal Capital Territory Administration (FCTA)/Federal Capital Development Authority (FCDA) regarding the issues of resettlement.

5.0             ANALYSIS OF FINDS:

5.1             Changes in Socio-Economic Status of the Garki Community:

Fundamental in the salient issues militating against the movement is the change in socio economic status of the original inhabitants, particularly the Garki Community. In the absence of farm lands within the city, the people have resorted to trading and in various crafts. As observed, most houses in Garki Village adopt the dual purpose (commercial and residential mix), therefore, the provision of residential houses without adequate and commensurate commercial buildings has significantly generated fear in the minds of the people with regards to their economic survival.

5.2             The Concept of Integration:

The Garki Community have symbolic attachment to the location. In line with the integration plan earlier introduced in the year 1991 and partially executed, the people are now aware that they could possibly be retained in their location subject to urban renewal plan.

5.3             Enumeration Exercise:

The roof for roof approach as against the house-hold style adopted in the allocation exercise did not effectively address the enumeration there are possibilities of having a multiple house-hold under one roof or a house hold occupying many roofs thereby giving chances for inaccurate enumeration.

5.4             Inconsistent and Untimely Policy Implementation:

The issue of time frame in planning any resettlement scheme is very critical. The time lag in driving the Apo Resettlement like other FCT Resettlement Schemes complicated the issue. It is a fact that from the year 2005 when the enumeration was conducted, a lot of demographic changes have taken place within the community and creating additional responsibilities for the attention of FCT Administration.

5.5             Database/Record Keeping:

So many Resettlement Schemes have taken place and managed by several Administrative outfits before the creation of Resettlement and Compensation Department in the year 2005. The management of records was in no doubt very poor, thereby putting the FCT Administration at a disadvantage.

5.6             The Issues of Other Nigerians:

Given the peculiarity of the FCT as the seat of Government and Centre of Unity, it is obviously difficult to embark on a exclusive Resettlement Scheme without a mix of other Nigerians. However, and in most cases the primary beneficiaries of the Resettlement project often sell their allocations to other Nigerians for monetary gains.

More so, within the Resettlement sites, particularly the reserved areas such as flood plains, are often interfered with by the Land Department/Abuja Geographical Information Systems (AGIS) in the name of carve outs and are often allocated to other Nigerians.

6.0             RECOMMENDATIONS:

  1. There should be a review of the FCT Resettlement policy in accordance with the best global practices which new policy should be approved by FEC and gazette.
  2. 75 people confirmed to have been omitted in allocation of houses and 105 omitted in the allocation of plots, be considered for resettlement immediately. See Appendix D1-D2.
  3. The 81 people that collected houses and 81 plots respectively at the integrated zone, should be made to return them to the administration. See Appendix E.
  4. Commercial plots should be provided in the proposed new layout, and allocate same to indigenes to care of their commercial interest.
  5. The approved movement allowance be reviewed upwards to the of One Hundred and Ten Thousand Naira (N110,000).
  6. A unit of Development Control Department be resident in the Resettlement site for harmonious working relationship with staff of Department of Resettlement and Compensation.
  7. The FCT should give priority to resettlement projects by ensuring adequate budgetary provisions, prompt payment of compensation, and timely implementation of all resettlement schemes.
  8. In view of the growing security implications and the huge capital resources involved in Resettlement and Compensation, FCTA should seek the approval of His Excellency, Mr. President to place the scheme in the National priority budget.
  9. The movement of His Excellency to Apo Resettlement Site should be in phases commencing with those certified to have been fully settled to move within the period of 3 months. See Appendix F1-F2.
  10. The neighbourhood centres/public facilities which have been allocated to other Nigerians should be revoked and reverted to AMAC for its original use/purpose for the benefit of the indigenes.
  11. With respect to the provisions of infrastructure at Phase II, it is recommended that the compensation claims be paid immediately, this will allow the contractors to resume work and complete the project as scheduled.
  12. There should always be an enlarged community participation in the entire resettlement process.
  13. The Sa-peyi’s new palace be remodeled, befitting a chief’s palace.
  14. The Abuja Municipal Area Council should remodel the houses of all the sub-chiefs under the Sa-peyi of Garki.
  15. Efforts should be made to create a robust data base for the Department of Resettlement by the Department on Bio metric data management should be fully funded by the FCT Administration to enable the of the contract as scheduled.
  16. In consideration of all those omitted in the earlier allocations, three sites have been proposed viz;

a)                 The adjoining part of E22 Apo Tafe behind the existing mechanic village,

b)                 The adjoining parcel of land within Phase II, E27 Apo Resettlement towards E19 and

c)                 The adjoining extension within Zone A, E27 towards A09, has been identified for the approval of the FCT Administration.

  1. The FCT Administration should urgent steps in implementing the recommendations of the Committee to facilitate Out-of-Court settlement.

CONCLUSION

The Committee members sincerely thank Honourable Minister of State for finding us worthy and giving us the to contribute our own quota in resolving the issues affecting the Apo Resettlement Scheme. It is our hope that the Honourable Minister of State will find these recommendations useful for the administration and implement same to resolve the issue of resettlement at hand.

 

 

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